News

Charles B. Howdill’s finest surviving secular building, the long-derelict former Beckworth’s Viaduct Tannery, has recently been converted into flats.  William Beckworth (1841-1911) was a pillar of the Primitive Methodist community and a prominent citizen of Leeds, whose tannery business had branches in Lincoln and Bramley. Beckworth apparently also owned a...

The first child ever cremated at Lawnswood Cemetery in Leeds was Dorothy Howdill, who died of scarlet fever in 1905: she was the daughter of local architect and photographer Charles B. Howdill and his wife Laura (née Garth). The Howdills were pillars of the Primitive Methodist Church: Charles’s architect father...

News in from Nicky Howdill, great-granddaughter of Charles B. Howdill: an old Howdill chapel in Kensal Green, North London, is being restored to its former glory. In the list of Howdill chapels compiled for his 2011 book chapter about the father-and-son practice, Colin Dews refers to it as ‘College Park...

News in from Nicky Howdill, great-granddaughter of Charles B. Howdill: an old Howdill chapel in Kensal Green, North London, is being restored to its former glory. In the list of Howdill chapels compiled for his 2011 book chapter about the father-and-son practice, Colin Dews refers to it as ‘College Park...

We know that Charles B. Howdill taught building-related subjects for many years at Huddersfield Technical College, as well as at Leeds School of Art, and the Leeds, Batley and Dewsbury Technical Schools. A recently discovered textbook entitled Building Construction Class-Book: With an Introduction to Graphic Statics as Applied to Roof...

  One of the few benefits of the pandemic lockdown has been the chance to catch up on long-postponed tasks. We’d been meaning to create a Wikipedia page for Charles Barker Howdill for quite a while, and now the entry is live. As with all Wikipedia pages, the Howdill entry...

Last August I spent a fascinating afternoon at the Leeds Museums and Galleries Discovery Centre, looking through Charles Barker Howdill’s copious Jutland notes. The well-worn small green leather folder contains around a hundred looseleaf items, most of them handwritten jottings for his slide lectures about Jutland. We know that Howdill...